Is your business ready for the Coronavirus? Cyber security is critical now!



Justin Lam

You want to find your tribe of raving fans. I'm gonna help you do it. This is the digging deep podcast with Three Sixty Media where we help you do better business.


Hey everybody, this is Justin Lam and this is episode three of digging deeper. We help business owners improve businesses. I'm here today with a gentleman who is run two businesses since immigrating from Israel in 2005. Focusing in the tech space, and most recently has launched a cybersecurity company, which has won a 2019 and 2020. Cyber Security practitioner practitioner security


Omer Segoly

practitioner award.


Justin Lam

emergence, emerging Oh man, this is gonna be tough. We have one more emergent emerging emerging cyber security cyber security practitioner for 2018 2019. Please welcome for me, Omer Segoly, Omer welcome. Thank you for showing up on the show. Pleasure to be part of it. Yeah. So it's exciting. So I think well, now it's coronavirus, and you know, it's funny because you're cybersecurity and you deal with different type of viruses. But let's back that up a little bit. Talk to me a little bit about, you know, where that journey came from and you know, how you got into it.


Unknown Speaker

So, yeah, it's, for me, it has kind of been part of my life from ever since I can remember myself. My parents actually did this thing that at the time pissed me off, but now I'm actually happy about a day they denied me from having any video game consoles at home. So I couldn't have any you know, like, my kid my friends were having like, back then it was before like PlayStation was like the Mega Drive and, you know, the old school consoles, I couldn't have any of that the only my only outlet was PC gaming and, and so I got into PCs, and you know, overall, I mean, it was Like a very early stage, like, kind of late 80s, early 90s got into it from a very young age. My dad is my dad was in tech so he was able to teach me and helped me you know, dig deeper into it and and I'm very thankful for that. So yes, I didn't get to play around too much with computer or video games when I was young, but you know, it led to where I am today. So um, I am very grateful for for that opportunity and I'm not the typical IT guy would say I'm not like I'm also very sporty and you know, I was always into playing around outside and hanging out with my friends playing sports, varsity, all that stuff. And, and even today, like I would say that I'm not your typical IT guy.


Unknown Speaker

Cool. And so you must have gone to school for some capacity?


Omer Segoly

Yeah, so I went when I immigrated into Canada in 2005. I did go to BCIT. I studied an IT management program there. So I came in also in high school, I was doing a lot of programming or programming and computer science. So I was always into it and self taught myself a lot of it as well. I graduated from BCIT in 2008, perfect timing, similar to now it's a lot of unknown uncertainty and a lot of a recession. So a lot of companies were laying people off and nobody would really give someone like me at a time and opportunity. And, you know, bring on board someone who was kind of fairly fresh and junior, so I kind of got forced into starting my own business.


Justin Lam

And so tell me about that, like so starting a business. You know, entrepreneurship is really where we focus a lot of attention to in terms of trying to help other business owners build it, but tell me what that struggle was like or what that what what that was like when, when you were there looking into the industry and going well, what the hell am I going to do now? What were the decisions you made? And you know, what were the some of the struggles that you had then?


Omer Segoly

So first of all, you I had to take the call it a leap of faith like, do you know, do I take the entrepreneurial route? Or do I go and get like a nine, five somewhere? To me, there weren't many nine to five jobs, I'm sure I could have found one if I really wanted to, and spend some more time on that. But on the flip side, I got some good advice. And my parents at the time, they were saying that, you know, at this point on where you got nothing to lose, you know, you just came out of school. You don't have you don't have to pay your mortgages yet and you don't have kids and all that kind of stuff to worry about. So, you know, start maybe, you know, if you're thinking about it, maybe just go ahead and start your first company. Just roll with it, see how it goes, What's the worst that could happen?


Justin Lam

And so well, so then you're lucky because I didn't really get that opportunity. I was forced into it. And I made a decision much to the dismay of my parents. And at the end of it all, you know, like, I went through all of it, and I think now they've they've decided that either either they're on board, or they're just pretending they're on board and just gave up on me. I can't tell the difference between the two but one of the two is there. Okay, so you decided to become an entrepreneur at that moment, other than then not knowing what the hell you're doing in the business world, like, what other obstacles Did you encounter and base?


Omer Segoly

I mean, at a time I was trying to please everybody, you know, so that was a that's a classical, like, entrepreneurial lesson to be learned. You can't please everybody. And, you know, if you if you try to, you're going to hit a wall eventually. So, you know, at the time I was, I was into web development, I was into it and sort of it administration, you know, lower level than what I do today, of course, but also, you know, people wanted graphic design help and social media was kind of a new thing back then. So people would come at me with all these different demands and issues and I would just try to solve them all and and of course, it's on two hands and, you know, 24 hours in the day, so I started hitting, you know, I hit a wall pretty quick. I was working 13-14 hours a day, but you can only do it for so long, right? And, and so eventually I ended up having to contract and subcontract. And, I learned some lessons along the way as well. I had Filipino, like two full time Filipinos working for me at one point. That's good and bad. You know, it's good because you wake up in the morning and your work should be done. But it's bad because also it keeps you up at night. Because in reality, you know, you do have to supervise and make sure that like quality assurance and all that kind of stuff, no one is going to look after your customers the way you are. So I learned a few lessons along the way. But one thing that really helped me actually kind of kick off my whole, my whole entrepreneurial journey was, you know, when it first came out of BCIT, and decided to kind of take that leap of faith and go for it. I actually got a contract. So it was it was a solid contract. paid me I think $40 an hour, which seemed like a lot of money at the time. Still a lot of money, obviously, depending on what you do, but as Yeah, so That was that was quite good. It guaranteed me like it was almost like a full time position like, but very flexible as well. So I was able to pick that up and that really helped me, you know, fill my pockets and, and helped me kind of get, like get started and take off from there. So I got you know, I took that contract I took a few smaller contracts along the way as well. And I got to a level where I was just I was just like, too busy. It was like a chicken in the egg game. You know, like I got I got busy to the point where I was like, you know, I could probably push it for a bit longer, but maybe now's the time to bring that next guy and so I brought in my first employee about Yeah, I'd say probably three months into the, into my new company. And and then again it was the chicken the egg. So he was able to take on a lot of the work, I was able to kind of get out in the field and start doing some business development and generate some more more business and more income and then we got busy, busy, busy, busy to the point where we then brought in the second person and then was just constantly playing that game.


Justin Lam

And that's a that's not as common scenario in I think entrepreneurship, I think a lot of people struggle, you know, when they're getting busy that they're not able then to hand off. And so, you know, when I go to talk to people and try to advise them on how to save and condense that money, it's looking at the subcontract work and actually backing that up, that they should actually have better control over the quality and the policies and procedures that are outlined in it. And, you know, you're you're an interesting case, because, yes, you did all the work up until a point where you couldn't handle it. You just started handling handing it off or, you know, sending it to an overseas department or subcontractor. And I think that's a lot of difficulty for an entrepreneur to really want to let go of, especially if you're, especially if it's a passion craft, right, like photographers or Graphic Designers or you know, in some case it what is that mental shift that you feel? You know, when you're at that point and and, you know, how do you how did you find trust in giving that to somebody?


Omer Segoly

I mean, I, I can't I'm not gonna lie like I am a perfectionist and I had a really hard time with it. And at the end of day, it didn't work out. I had to, I had to pull out and it just, it didn't also work out for some of the projects that I wanted to take part in. Like, I had to be very sensitive about what I do. And but yeah, it was, it was trial and error. And, and if I was to do it all over again, and I am doing it all over again, this is actually I've started to launch my fourth business. I wouldn't I wouldn't subcontract or outsource to the Philippines or anywhere outside of Canada. I keep it all in house. And obviously there's pros and cons to both.


Justin Lam

Yeah, I mean, that there is a lot of people who outsource overseas because they feel If the price is cheaper, but then there is sort of that caveat, where some people feel like, you know, what you pay is what you're going to get. And, and a lot of times, unfortunately, it's true and you hope that's not true. And I feel like things like Fiverr and Upwork sometimes do a great disservice to the industry, because I think it gives you allows you into thinking, Oh, yeah, like this is going to work out really well. But I think with all things, it's still a matter of taking that time to interview and then having the right processes in place. When we tell people outsource things, I feel like you should outsource the things that are easily repeatable, but never outsource the IP, the intellectual property. How do you feel about that?


Yeah, I 100% agree with you. I just had a conversation about that exact same thing today. Don't outsource your core competency? Yeah. Yeah. And so now I think what your your original company Techtone was, is Now in its seventh year,


Omer Segoly

And that's actually not my original company. It's actually my that was my third company.


Justin Lam

Oh, sorry. Third company. Okay, cool. And so Tectone is the one I've known you for. And now you've decided to move into a new branch of business, particularly relevant to this day and age, that Cyber Unit, you got it. And, you know, there's so many parallels between, you know, what's happening now in the world, and everything is getting shut down and everything's getting paralyzed. And to what cybercrime is doing to people's computers, and mobile phones, and how easy it is to be infected. So maybe you can you share a little bit about what cybersecurity really means in for people nowadays, that they're moving off of desktops and more into the mobile environment.


Omer Segoly

Yeah, so you know, traditionally, when you set up a business or even just when you buy a computer, everyone knows Hey, you know, I just bought a computer you kind of put you know, 22 I bought a computer, I need some sort of antivirus solution. For the most part, people are aware of that. And people have been pretty good with that. Not to say that they're always choosing the right products, but at least he got something doesn't always do enough justice, but they're aware of it. And a lot of it has to do with awareness. But when we started seeing over the last couple years is that people are aware of that. Yeah, they're completely neglecting other areas that may have even more sensitive information data in them for example, mobile devices 99% of people I talked to have absolutely no security on their mobile devices yet. You know, we take our mobile devices into pretty much anywhere we go, you know, meetings, washroom, bedside, anywhere you name it, your mobile phones, usually in your back pocket or somewhere next to you.


Justin Lam

Yeah, absolutely. But what are the type of the, the type of threats that exist there because like, you know, at one point there, they're sort of myths that, you know, Macs were invincible and like, nobody really attacked Macs and they were really safe. And I think a lot of people think that mobile phones are The same because you have everything like two factor authentic vacation and like you know your passwords are are encrypted and you know all this sort of stuff but it isn't that safe like they're there you can still click on to websites and or things that can paralyze your phone or take your data correct.


Omer Segoly

For sure. Yeah. So very, very much right about that. So you know, hackers like to focus on on areas where people have their guard down and so for you know, many years it was PCs, you know, there was just like a PC was exploding and and very vulnerable, a lot of exploitation. So that's really where hackers were hanging out and spending most of your efforts on and and in Macs, you know, Macs got really popular and Apple products and there is this misconception, I still hear it quite a lot actually, that you know, Macs are bulletproof. But we're starting to see that that's actually far from reality far from truth. Just a couple of weeks ago, there was a study that came came forward and and indicated and prove that Mac's are actually now under greater attack than PCs. And so Macs are actually far from bulletproof. And, mobile devices, you know, Android and iOS, they're both exactly the same phenomenon. It's like, you know, people don't they expect the vendor or the manufacturer, you know, Apple or Google to kind of take care of, of security for them that you know, the thing they got, they got, like facial recognition. And, you know, Apple is kind of vetting all the apps and so on. But we still seem like every, every few weeks, or every couple months, you see some, some pretty scary stats and numbers and articles that, you know, will go as far as saying, you know, 2000, or 5000, apps just got pulled out of the App Store. And a lot of times it's too late. So again, hackers are aware that nobody has the key, like 99% of people don't have any security on their mobile devices. And so that's really where they're focusing the most. And so we started seeing a lot of attacks, targeting the mobile vector back in 2019 and We're going to see a lot more of that in 2020. And moving forward.


Justin Lam

And so how safe is it when you know you're typing in a password? and Apple says, Do you want to save this password? Or your phone is better to do that? Or is it better to get a third party thing like LastPass?


Omer Segoly

I would get a third party. I mean, obviously, the apple keeping option is better than nothing, for sure. But it doesn't really do it doesn't really do the work that it should. The other thing about, you know, storing in your browser, like Chrome does that as well. Right? Chrome has, like a built in Password Manager in Safari, which ties into the key chain, but a lot of people don't realize that, you know, if you're storing your passwords in your browser, or in Apple key chain, if somebody has access to your computer, and you know, most likely they know your password, or they're just you just kind of let them you know, use your computer temporarily. They can actually get into all your passwords. So I would say it's not safe. The other thing is that it's already doing the educational piece that it's not really training you on how to improve your password. It doesn't really, as far as I know, I don't think it actually lets you like generate like strong and complex passwords, though.


Justin Lam

I don't think so.


Omer Segoly

So it's doing you know, it's doing about maybe 20% of what, what, like a company like LastPass, which is it's great option actually, for password management. It's a third party that lets you manage it's kind of like a vault for all your passwords and all your sensitive information like passwords, and you know, cin number, you can, you can store a lot more than just passwords there. But what it does is it allows you to store very complex passwords and unique passwords for all of your services. And it doesn't just allow you to store them, it also makes you more efficient. So when you want to log into a specific, you know, online service, you go there and then right away LastPass will identify that you have a password associated with that account. And then it would actually just log you in for you so it makes it more secure and more efficient at the same time and passwords. Man I can't I can't stress it enough like people are getting like people have no idea how much how much you out there on them. There's a dark web. Some people, probably you've heard about the dark web. It's a place where horrible people, a lot of hackers, but just horrible people in general go to sell and buy stuff like weapon. And you know, human trafficking, just horrible, horrible stuff. But our focus is really cybersecurity and corporate data. And there's so much corporate data on the dark web for sale, people have no idea. And so if you use one single password for all your devices, all your logins, what's going to happen is one of those, one of those accounts probably will get breached at one point, maybe not, you personally get breached. But the vendor themselves like that, you know, like LinkedIn got hacked back in 2016. Canva, you probably know them for graphic design, they got hit just in the last couple of years and every every week, or every few days, even I get an email and alert saying, you know, this one company and we're talking massive companies as well. The company is begging They're all under attack, they're all getting hit, they're all getting breached. And when, when, when a hacker gets into one of those systems, typically what they do, I mean, there's a lot of many different reasons why they would want to breach a company like that. But once they get in, typically what it will do is it will take the database that contains all the emails and passwords and dump it onto the dark web and try to sell it for money. And so if you're using one password for all of your, all your services, and third parties, and so on, what hackers would do is they would they would take that password and try it against every possible service that you might be using that password and then and that's what you need to have strong, complex and unique passwords for all of your services. And it sounds like impossible, right? But when you have a third party like LastPass, that allows you to do it efficiently, it makes it a lot easier. And it also helps do it in the in a team environment. So a lot of times people have to share passwords and share accounts. And so instead of you know trying to kind of like think about different key phrases or things that you guys might know and but then you have to change it once in a while. You have to let the other person know, you could do it very efficiently in a system like LastPass.


Justin Lam

Yeah, yeah. And that's something that I definitely enjoy a lot more of are in terms of being able to send to contractors or, you know, some team members who are remote and being able to just send them access without them having to like, keep track of whatever password is current at whatever time that we're at. So, the other thing is, is now because of the pandemic outbreak of Corona virus, a lot of people and companies are trying to figure out ways to work remotely. And you know, part of that is being on a tablet or computer or on their phone and being able to access corporate data. So is that is there a way for companies to look at security in that in that standpoint, and you know, what can they do to protect themselves?


Omer Segoly

Yes, I mean, it's very unfortunate of what's happening right now. But we started seeing the kind of move and trend towards, you know, the work from home policy in the last couple years has been good. Very popular. There's companies out there that like, like work in automatic, the company that runs WordPress like they they're purely work from home company. And we'll probably start seeing that a lot more. But now, it's interesting because now we're sort of forced into it. I mean, today, you know, we're still kind of beginning of March 2020. We'll see what happens in the next few weeks, we'll probably see a big push towards work from home for everybody. It might be mandatory in some countries it is. And and there's a lot to think about as employers, business owners and managers, you really have to think about the implications of what it means to all of a sudden let your workforce go outside of your parameter or outside of your network and let them log in from different places. I mean, you're creating, you're really worsening your security posture, possibly overnight and a lot of people don't really think ahead and grasp what it means for your your overall security, hygiene and what could end up happening if you don't do properly. So things that we've already been working on for the last couple years. Because it has been this trend is, you know, beyond the parameters of security. So, again, securing your mobile devices, we have amazing security solutions for mobile devices, making sure that there's nothing malicious on your phone, because a lot of times, you know, the company will own the mobile device. But other times, it could be a BYOD scenario where you know, bring your own device people, people bring their own phones, much like laptops, we're starting to see BYOD laptops, right. Or people working from home, you have no idea what's going on, under in their environments, you don't know if they let their kids play with a phone or laptop at night. And, you know, download all this funny apps. A lot of a lot of apps, like I said, are malicious and you know, whether or not in you know, it's sometimes you download an app, and you'll be legitimate. And then the next day, a hacker group will actually buy that development company out. Or maybe, maybe it's like an abandoned app that, you know, the guy was making enough money. And so hackers will come about and look for those kind of opportunities. Get into it, and then overnight, you're basically you know, in the pockets of hundreds of thousands of people, so it's really important to secure your mobile devices, your tablets, and any computer anything that accesses your corporate data should be secure.


Justin Lam

So how does say, so somebody is interested in this like do a what's the website?


Omer Segoly

So check out Cyberunit.com. We service primarily small businesses, we do work with some enterprise, but we have amazing packages for small businesses, anywhere from like one employee up to 50. We work really well with and and what we do is we create a parameter around your operations, even outside of your network outside of your your actual office. So we give you complete security for all your computers, mobile devices and cloud. So we talked about devices, we talked about computers, and we talked about mobile devices, but another big area Justin is, is cloud. We're gonna we out we all use Google G Suite 365, Dropbox, Slack, you name it, and people think there's again misconception that the big guys are looking after your data. But guess what? When some when shit goes down? Am I allowed to swear? Yeah, yeah. So I swear, yeah, I dropped a lot. And so when you know, when it goes down, you're going to talk to that you're going to go upstairs and talk to Google. And they'll say, Sorry, you should have read it, you should have read the fine print you signed off on it when you signed up, you know, there's in fine print. If you look closely, there's a section about shared responsibilities. And what that means is that, like, let's say, let's pick on Google. So Google is responsible for certain things, they're responsible to make sure that, you know, nobody drives the truck into their data center and Yanks out all the hard drives and runs off. They're responsible for a lot of security aspects. But if somebody breaches one of your accounts that is on you, that's new, and you're it and and so there's a lot that you have to be responsible for, and people are just kind of, unfortunately not doing. Sometimes it's pretty basic things but they're just not doing them and they find out too late. Once there's a breach, it can get I mean, I see them All the time, unfortunately, a lot of companies come to us after a breach, it gets very expensive and very tricky to get a company out of a scenario like that sometimes I'm gonna say a horrible stat, which, which I've been aware of for quite some time. 60% of companies that, that get hacked go out of business within six months. Wow, that's crazy. Yeah, that's. So it's a lot easier for us to have a conversation right now. And make sure that you have all your ducks in a row before the fact rather than after the fact that it gets very, very expensive. And yes, the cyber insurance, cyber liability insurance and so on. But we're starting to see a lot of companies getting denied as well. Because again, there's some clauses there that you have to be aware of, when you're signing up for services like that.


Justin Lam

Amazing. So just a recap, from some ways that people can protect themselves would be to change passwords, if even better, to use something like LastPass, a third party software that helps manage all that to kind of be careful What you're downloading and what you're playing around with? And then of course, contact you.


Omer Segoly

Yeah, I mean, there's a lot more you can do, we basically we like to let our clients focus on what they do best. And so we have, we have packages that really will do everything from A to Z for you. We make it very painless and affordable. We also have a great promotion right now going on for to support companies with Corona virus and and what's going on right now. There's obviously everybody's taking a hit. But it's very important to make sure that your data and your operations are still secure because it's temporary, you know, we're all going to go through some tough times, but then they will bounce back up and we want to make sure that when we do that our businesses are not you know, permanently hit with a breach or some horrible like that and so, we are offering 20% discount on our cybersecurity packages to anybody who signs up right now in March 2020. And let's hope again, covert 19 coronavirus is temporary and and goes away very quickly but we have to be prepared to make sure that We were not jeopardizing our businesses and operations.


Justin Lam

Yeah, I mean, I think on top of that, like, the good thing that could come out of it all is that the world all of a sudden has a different type of infrastructure around the corporate workplace. I know there's a lot of movement in that direction where people are working from home, co working spaces and whatnot, you know, and trying to get away from that big, tall corporate building. And I think something like this, which kind of forces people to be remotes. And to be away from those, I think it's going to cause a different type of trend in the in the work environment.


Omer Segoly

You're totally right about. It's a big eye opener for everybody. Yeah, and yeah, I guess it was only a matter of time, like things were would have probably shifted in that direction. Anyway, we started seeing a lot of even co working spaces really, like they're just popping up, left, right and center everywhere. And again, with co working spaces. It's kind of like working from home like you like you don't no longer control the environment in the network and and you're sharing space with With you know, you know kids in the co working space but but with other offices and other other businesses and if one gets hit, it can trickle down to everybody.


Justin Lam

Yeah, absolutely.


Omer Segoly

Yeah. So same as you know, the home environment. If If your laptop's secure, that's great. Or if it's not secure, most likely it's not secure properly. One way or another if somebody else at home gets hit or and gets, you know, gets breached, it will most like malware is sophisticated enough nowadays that it will actually look to see what else in the network and propagate and permeating into other systems. It's actually getting to a point is a horrible thing going on right now. I did a malware it's called a motet. What it does is it actually so once you get infected with it, it will it will lock down your computer you know, holding for ransom, all that horrible stuff, but it will actually start looking into other neighboring networks around you. So it will it will look through your you know, all the available wireless connections. And we'll actually try and brute force its way in To your neighbors networks or your next door office networks by trying different passwords, and kind of going through the dictionary and try different combinations called brute force and, and it's starting to spread very, very fast. And so, you know, there's a lot, a lot out there. Hopefully the listeners are not, you know, sitting at home, scared out of their minds. If you're worried about any of this kind of stuff, or if you know, somebody, somebody who is definitely feel free to approach us, you can email us at security at cyber unit comm or just check out our website. sabrina.com.


Justin Lam

Cool. For those of you who are listening on Spotify, we do have it on YouTube, and so I'll have the link in the description there. But yeah, thank you so much for the time. I know you've got to go pick up the kid, but always appreciate it. It's always nice to have a good conversation with you. But for those of you guys, if you guys enjoyed that, please hit that subscribe button. Follow comment. Let us know how you like it. One thing I always ask everybody At the end of the show is what is a resource that person can go and look at to learn more about something that you're passionate about whether it's cybersecurity, or just something in general.


Omer Segoly

I mean, LinkedIn, if you don't want to do all the homework and constantly, you know, research and see what's happening and what could be impacting you follow my company on LinkedIn, we're constantly we're posting about two or three times a day we'll be posting, you know, articles and different posts that are actually impactful for small businesses and entrepreneurs. So that's a great resource right there. Maybe I'm biased to say that but we're doing the legwork for you and you can follow us there. Look up cyber unit on LinkedIn.


Justin Lam

Awesome. Perfect. Thanks, man. Have a good one.


Omer Segoly

Thanks for having me. Thanks.



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